Wild garlic and Purslane Pesto

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Kriegerv

I have been looking forward to this sunny spring all the time. Finally it is here! The sunshine is of course one of the main reasons why I am so longing for spring. However, the other reason which is at least as important as the sunshine, is my huge excitement about those tasty fresh vegetables and fruits from our region! And, the wild garlic is definitely on the very top of my “most wanted” list.

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

I appreciate the garlic-like taste of these wild vegetables a lot. It is an absolute all-rounder. Wild garlic pesto, wild garlic soup, wild garlic pasta, wild garlic butter… yummy…

As the first wild garlics were offered for sale on the weekly market in our town, these juicy green vegetables were the first booties of my shopping basket. Wait, what’s that? Right beside the wild garlic on the stall full of fresh veggies,  I saw a small pile of pale green herbaceous plants. Their leaves were heart-shaped, their stems bright and almost transparent… what a beautiful plant!

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

The farmer explained to me: “Their name is purslane. Please, have a try!” He handed me one, I slowly chewed on it. The leave was very mild and had a slight nutty flavor. The stems tasted slightly sweet. What a great thing! (Having arrived home I googled and learned that this was also a kind of wild vegetable and had been used as a medicinal plant in ancient times.)

“What do you think if I mix the purslane with the wild garlic to make a pesto out of them? ” I asked the nice farmer. He shrugged his shoulders and replied with a broad smile : “No idea, but it doesn’t sound bad. Please tell me about the result, after you have tried it.”

” All right! I’ll do that!”

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

So, this is where my wild garlic and purslane pesto came from. You see, if you need an idea for your new recipes, just go to the weekly market!  Flashes of inspiration will reach you there! 😉

The result was fantastic. I really like this balance of tastes in this pesto. It is milder and more harmonious than a pure wild garlic pesto. The mild nutty and slightly sweet flavor of the purslane has contributed significantly to this balance.

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

This heavenly tasty pesto goes wonderfully with pasta, on bread, as a marinade for shrimps or meat, or sensually delicious as a dip for my wild garlic dumplings ! The recipe follows. 😉

Ingredients:

200g wild garlic
100g purslane
2 cloves of garlic
50g pine nuts
1 pinch of salt
30g freshly grated Parmesan
20g freshly grated Pecorino
Plenty of olive oil in good quality

Mash the garlic cloves with pine nuts and salt in a mortar. Mix all ingredients except olive oil with a blender very well. Then mix in the oil slowly until you reach a creamy texture.

That’s it! Enjoy!

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6 thoughts on “Wild garlic and Purslane Pesto

  1. Pingback: wild garlic pesto orecchiette - Grits & Chopsticks

  2. Pingback: Seizoensgroenten en -fruit van mei - De Foodsier

  3. Hazel

    Look delicious, I’m going to try it as I have lots of purslane growing here but my purslane doesn’t look like the green plant in your photos here! Just curious, it looks more like lambs lettuce!

    Reply
    1. Qin Post author

      Thanks! You are right. The most common kind of purslane (season May-September) does look like lambs lettuce. The one I used for this recipe is the winter purslane which has the heart form. Hope I could answer your question. Have fun with trying this recipe. 🙂

      Cheers, Qin

      Reply

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