Tag Archives: pasta

Pasta with artichokes and garlic

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

At the weekly market I found these beautiful mini artichokes, whose magical violet-green color looked so appealing that I absolutely had to take some of them home. At that moment I still did not know yet what I should do with them. One thing was clear, they were to be fried with garlic together. This is the way I love to prepare artichokes best. Continue reading

Ravioli with chorizo and sauerkraut

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

I know, I know… it sounds pretty crazy … chorizo, sauerkraut and ravioli? Does it fit all together? It does indeed! I promise you, these raviolis will get you addicted! 😉

In my previous posts I have added this cross-over feature to a couple of traditional pasta dishes. For example: German ravioli with shiitake or sauerkraut dumplings. Continue reading

Homemade Pasta with Chanterelle Walnut Pesto

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Maybe because the days are becoming noticeably shorter and colder, right now I am so much into pasta & co. “Pasta makes happy.” – I once heard. Whether it is true, I can not say. But one thing is clear: Pasta tastes just fantastic! Furthermore, it is so easy and quick to prepare. The most important thing: A great sauce is a must!

Since I got my great food processor, I make pasta mostly myself. It is amazingly simple and faster than you could think. And I can say it again and again loudly: Fresh pasta tastes just so much better! 🙂 Continue reading

Spicy Sichuan Chicken Noodle 川味雞絲麵

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Food is memories. For me, tastes act like memory chips for a computer. Many of my childhood memories are connected to different tastes. One of my memories of my culinary childhood was a spicy cold noodle dish with chicken, which is a very famous dish from Sichuan. In my hometown, this tasty dish is popular in the summer, when the extremely high temperature climbs up over 35 degrees celsius. Continue reading

German Raviolis with Shiitake and Peanut Coconut Sauce

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

The locals of Swabia (a region in South Germany, neighboring Bavaria) call these German raviolis “Maultäschle”, which sounds really cute for me. My Swabian friends have told me that the nickname of these savory pastries is “Herrgottsbscheißerle”, which means “A tiny cheat on dear god”. Continue reading

German Pasta – Spaetzle and Prawns with Chinese Sacha-Sauce

© tastewithoutborders.com

© tastewithoutborders.com

Before I moved to a southern German region (the locals call it Schwabenlaendle), I had heard a lot about the “strange character” of the locals – Schwaben. According to the opinion of most of our friends and family, the Schwaben should be a special group of Germans with quite a difficult character.

They are supposed to be grasping and the nerd – prototypes among all Germans. It should be almost impossible for someone from other German regions to integrate into the circle of the Schwaben. So, you can imagine how difficult it could be for someone from another country! Continue reading

Mushroom Pesto

© tastewithoutborders.com

© tastewithoutborders.com

I love pasta, especially if it is freshly made and eaten with homemade pesto and plenty of ground parmesan or pecorino cheese.

After the basil pesto and red pesto with sun-dried tomatoes, I have discovered another pesto for my beloved pasta, which absolutely is becoming one of my favorites: mushroom pesto! Continue reading

Wonton in Chili Oil Sauce

© tastewithoutborders.com

© tastewithoutborders.com

Wonton is known in Germany as a part of a bland soup but in China, wonton (in Mandarin Chinese: Hundun) is a typical main course, which is especially popular for lunch. In many regions of China, wonton is often served in a freshly cooked hot chicken stock and is therefore particularly popular in cold winter. But in my home province Sichuan, wonton is mostly served together with a hot sauce with spicy chili oil. It’s totally delicious. I love this version of wonton the most!

In Sichuan dialect we call this meat-filled dumpling “chaoshou“. Like many other Chinese dishes, there is also a great story for its name. Chaoshou means “folding the arms”. This name came from ancient China when in the winter it was as cold as today, but people still knew nothing about gloves. The Sichuan Chinese found a simple solution to keep their hands warm in the freezing winter. They folded their arms, in order to put their hands into their wide sleeves. Continue reading