Dim Sum: filled with Soup 灌湯包

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

In one of my previous articles I have already introduced my favorite dim sum – Bao. Today I have a special version of this great dim sum for you.

This version of Bao is also stuffed with a very tasty meat filling like the classic ones. But it has even more! When you bite on it, a fantastic tasting chicken soup will flow from the “bag” right into your mouth. Awesome, isn’t it? :-D

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

In China dim sum comes always with an additional soup or a cup of tea. This soup filled dim sum thus combines both dishes in one! I love this idea! :-D

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Especially it is even easier to prepare than the classical Bao. Namely, we don’t need the tricky yeast dough for this recipe!

In Shanghai there is a famous tea house which is well known for its Bao filled with soup. It is always crowded in the tea house. Even at the take away counter there is an endless queue all the time.

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

In the traditional way of preparation for this dim sum people cook the pig skin in water so long  until a thick gelatinous mass is produced. This will be added to the filling later on. From the heat while steaming this solid mass, it will turn into liquid again.  This is how you get the soup in the dim sum. Really great idea!

 

 

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

For my version I decided for a homemade chicken soup with gelatin sheets. On one hand, the chicken soup taste adds a great aroma to the filling, on the other hand, this version has got significantly less calories. ;-)

But if you have no time to cook your own chicken soup yourself, no problem. Just take a good chicken stock from the jar.

 

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Ingredients and preparation (about 25 pieces):

For the filling:
250g gelled chicken soup (out of homemade chicken soup or chicken stock in the jar)
made of 400ml hot chicken soup and 6 gelatin leaves: Soak the gelatin leaves in cold water for about 5 min, squeeze out gently, add to the hot chicken soup and allow to dissolve. Chill in the refrigerator overnight.

200g minced meat from the butcher
½ tsp salt
4 tablespoons water
1 egg
50g prawns without shell

Mix the minced meat with the salt and water very well (add spoon after spoon). Add the egg and mix well, too. Cut the shrimps in small cubes and also blend the gelled chicken soup in.

2 tbsp light soy sauce
1 tbsp sesame oil
2 tsp rice wine
½ tsp salt
½ teaspoon freshly grated ginger
Freshly ground pepper

Add the spices and sauce to the minced meat and shrimp mixture and mix well. Season with salt and pepper. For tasting, microwave a small portion of the filling for about 30 sec. so you can judge whether the filling is sufficiently seasoned.

For the dough:
150g flour type 405
50g boiling water
50g cold water

  1. Sieve the flour in the bowl of the food processor, distribute the boiling water on the flour.  Stir at low speed until you get tiny loose pieces of dough. Then pour the cold water to it. Keep stirring until you get a sticky dough chunk. Now take the dough out of the bowl and knead briefly and carefully with hand on a floured work surface. Then cover the dough with plastic wrap and let it rest for about 30 minutes.
  2. Roll the dough in a cylinder shaped form and cut into small pieces (ca. 1.5cm). Flatten each dough piece with your palm and roll out with a rolling pin to a thin round sheet (about 6 cm in diameter). Spread the filling on the round sheets. Pull up the edge of the dough sheet with your index finger and the thumb of the right hand, press the dough edge together until the dumpling is completely closed (important: it must be completely closed, otherwise the dim sum will loose its soup during steaming).
  3. Cut baking paper into small round pieces just the size of the Bao and put them under the Bao, place them into a bamboo steaming basket or steaming pot.
  4. Bring water to a boil in a wok. Place the bamboo steaming bowl on it, steam for 8-10 min.

Caution: Hot Soup at the first bite. ;-)

Genmaicha Mousse au Chocolate Tart 玄米茶杏撻

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Genmaicha??? I guess you were quite curious about what this could be when you were clicking on this post. ;-)

At least one thing I can tell you: This click has definitely been paid off! Because, today you’ll get to know a fabulous green tea. :-D

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Although I appreciate the wonderful smell of coffee very much, I am not a coffee drinker at all, but I really love tea. I like to drink European tea such as fruit tea and herbs tea. However, green tea, jasmine tea, oolong tea, white tea and co. are clearly my favorites.

During my trip to Japan last year, I discovered the wonderful genmaicha for me. Since then this tea has taken first place in my ranking list of the best teas.

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Now back to the answer for your question: Genmaicha is a species of green tea with roasted rice grains. According to a Japanese legend, the origin of this tea can be traced back to a Kyoto tea merchant who lived a long time ago. Apparently he should have invented this tea by accident (like almost all the most delicious foods all over the world): some crumbles of rice cakes dropped in his tea, he kept drinking the tea without taking those crumbles out of tea and loved the additional flavor of the baked rice cakes with the tea taste. Then he started to mix his green tea with roasted rice grains and sold this tea as a new assortment. It was a best seller!

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Whether this story is true, I can not judge. I assume that at least Chinese and Koreans will strongly disagree, for these two countries also have similar versions of green tea with roasted rice. The very close cultural and traditional ties between these three countries doesn’t really make everything easy.

But for me, it’s really not important who invented this great tea. The main thing is that it has been invented and I can fully enjoy it today! ;-)

Comparing to the other green teas, Genmaicha is much milder. The bitter taste of green tea is softened a lot by the roasting flavor of the rice grains.

 

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Pouring the hot water (80 degrees) onto the tea makes a seductive fragrance of roasted rice grains rise into your nose. It is absolutely a treat of multiple senses! Therefore using a teapot with a large opening is necessarily to illustrate this great fragrance experience.

Among the different genmaichas from different regions, I like the Japanese the most. Because the clever Japanese have mixed their unique lovely Macha powder in their genmaicha. This ground green tea powder of excellent quality adds a delighting green color to the Japanese genmaicha. When it comes to aesthetics, the Japanese are one of the best!

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

So, long story short: For my new experiment with tarts, this time I have laid my eyes on the genmaicha. If you have already followed my posts of last summer, then you must have already read about my Peach Ice Tea Tart. Today I have a sister version for you: Apricot-Genmaicha Tart!

If you feel like you want more sweets with green tea, check the Macha Mousse au Chocolate. Enjoy the great summer! :-)

Ingredients:

For the dough:
250g wheat flour
100g icing sugar
100g butter
1 egg

For the topping:
200g white chocolate
400g cream
3 egg yolks
5 TL Genmaicha (Asia Shop)

Preparation:

  1. For the dough: check the recipe of peach iced tea tart.
  2. For the Genmaicha cream: boil 150g cream in a saucepan, turn off the heat, add Genmaicha to the cream. Let the tea steep for about 10 minutes. Sieve the tea cream mixture, remove the tea leaves and rice grains. Then melt the chocolate while stirring constantly. Chill the chocolate cream. Add the rest of the cream in a tall mixing bowl and beat until stiff. Beat the egg yolks in a bowl until fluffy. Stir in the chocolate cream at first, then fold in the whipped cream gently.
  3. Spread the mousse on the chilled tart lay split apricots on top. Chill the tart in the refrigerator overnight.
  4. Serve with a cup of fresh brewed genmaicha. Yummy …

Green Peas Coconut Soup

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

There are actually people who do not like peas (can you imagine it?), such as my husband. To say it correctly: he DIDN’T like peas at all. Once he hears the word “pea”, his face looks like a crying clown. ;-)

Yet I am very proud that I was able to change his strong antipathy against this lovely vegetable. :-)

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

How did I do it? Well, it was not that hard… Just one secret tip: Take the fresh peas! July is the peak season for fresh peas per se. This is almost all you need. The fresh peas taste a thousand times better than the frozen ones.

Then you will only need a few fresh herbs such as mint, or maybe something more exotic, such as lemongrass and kaffir leaf. Then nothing stands in the way that everyone will love these lush green peas! :-D

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

I always enjoy it a lot to peel the thick green balls out of their green coats. Sometimes they try to escape my fingers and dance happily through my living room, where I love to do this kind of work at our dining table while listening to music.

I can almost hear their naughty laugh while they are rolling under the table, hiding themselves in the corners. Yes, I can tell you, peas are absolutely a vegetable with a cheerful nature. ;-)

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

For this soup I made up a Thai-inspired version. The sweet taste of the peas, fruity coconut milk, a few mint leaves, citron-scented lemon grass and kaffir leaves, and then THE peak for this exciting taste symphony: green chili, which gives this lovely soup a bite and a distinctive character.

My husband was blown away! :-)

Extra tip: For hot summer days, this soup tastes chilled super refreshing and sensationally delicious!

Bon appetit!

Ingredients (4 servings as starter):

1kg fresh peas in shell
Several fresh mint leaves
1 onion
1 clove of garlic
2 kaffir leaves
1 lemon grass
1 green chili pepper (I took the Jalapeño)
200ml coconut milk
½ tsp brown sugar
2 tbsp crème fraîche
1 tablespoon canola oil
Salt and pepper

Preparation:

Cook the peas in boiling salted water for about 3 minutes, chill peas with cold water and drain. Save the cooking water for later. Slice the onion and the garlic, cut lemon grass (remove the outer leaves) in shorter pieces, cut chilli into small rings.

Add canola oil in a saucepan and heat briefly. Add the chopped ingredients to fry, then the sugar, let it caramelise shortly. Pour in the coconut milk and bring to a boil.

Add the peas with mint, kaffir leaves and 300ml of the cooking water into the pot. Simmer for about 5 minutes. Remove the leaves and lemon grass. Purée the peas. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with a blob of crème fraîche on the soup.

Wok Zucchini with Grapefruit Ginger Sauce

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Do you like the combination of fruits and vegetables? Presenting this color gorgeousness on one plate definitely means a lot of fun for me. It is like playing a game with exciting colors and flavors.

Yellow zucchini, pink grapefruit, golden oranges … with a fruity and slightly spicy grapefruit-ginger sauce. If this does not give you a kick for a good mood, …  ;-)

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

The slightly sweet or sour taste of citrus gives the relatively neutral-tasting zucchini a wonderful summery flavor.

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Ingredients (2 servings):

1 yellow zucchini (cut into sticks)
1 onion (cut into thin strips)
2 cloves of garlic (cut into thin slices)
1/2 Thai chili (cored and cut into small pieces)
Juice of 1 grapefruit and 1 orange
Pulp of 1/2 grapefruit and 1/2 orange (remove the white skin and cut into slices)
1 piece of ginger (freshly grated)
2 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper

Preparation:

  1. Boil the juice with the grated ginger in a sauce pan over medium heat and let stand for about 10 minutes. Strain the juice through a sieve. Reheat the fluid in the pot. Cook until getting a thick sauce.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a wok briefly. Add the sliced ​​onion, chili and garlic, fry briefly. Add the zucchini and stir-fry 3-4 minutes. Pour the pulp of citrus into the wok and swirl gently. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Serve the zucchini with the grapefruit and ginger sauce on a large plate. This fits very well with jasmine rice.

Passion Fruit Yuzu Tart with Meringue

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Last Saturday was the 70th birthday of my mother-in-law. This lady with her lovely nature is really one of the great treasures which I found on my journey discovering Europe. ;-)

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Meanwhile, this great destination (Germany) has become my home, where I experience happiness and deep satisfaction in my heart. To all of this, my mother-in-law has surely contributed a great part. For her big birthday I wanted to bake a very special birthday cake to show my love and respect.

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

 

After several days of deliberation, I finally decided. It should be a summer tart with yuzu, a yummy popular fruit from East Asia which tastes similar like pomelo but a bit sauer. In this case, passion fruit fits incredibly well, considering both the taste and the color. To give the aesthetics a special kick, I decided to put a hood of sweet meringue on top of this  wonderful fruity tart.

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

It was the most elaborate cake I’ve ever made. I must confess that I was really curious if it could work out at all. ;-)

© Qin Xie-Krieger

© Qin Xie-Krieger

Fortunately, the result has become more than fantastic! The tart dough was wonderfully crispy. The filling nicely fruity and juicy. The meringue was enchantingly beautiful and sinfully sweet.

A special person deserves special food: No effort is too much. ;-)

Ingredients:

For the tart dough:

250g wheat flour
100g icing sugar
120g butter
1 egg (and optionally some water, to obtain a liquid volume of 60 ml)

Preparation: See the recipe peach iced tea tart.

For the filling:

2 tbsp yuzu honey (Korean or Japanese Yuzu tea, in asia shop)
Juice and grated peel of 2 lemons
3 passion fruits (pulp exempt)
250ml passion fruit nectar
85g butter
2 tbsp corn flour
3 egg yolks
1 egg
60g sugar

For the meringue:

4 egg whites (at room temperature)
200g sugar
2 tsp passion fruit powder (gourmet food shop)
2 tsp corn flour

Preparation:

  1. Prepare the pastry first (see the recipe of peach iced tea tart).
  2. Now the filling: distribute yuzu honey on the baked pastry. Boil the passion fruit nectar with the scraped pulp together in a pot for 10 minutes. Then run the juice through a sieve. Collect the juice (about 200ml).
  3. Mix the corn flour with lemon peel and place in a pot. Pour the lemon juice and the passion fruit juice and mix well. Bring to boil over medium heat, stir constantly, until the mixture thickens. As soon as it begins to bubble, take the pan off the heat, add butter, stir until the butter is melted completely.
  4. Beat the yolks, the egg and sugar together until the sugar is completely dissolved.
  5. Pour the lemon mixture carefully onto the egg mixture and mix well. Reheat everything over medium heat again. Stir constantly, until the mixture thickens. Set aside.
  6. Finally, the meringue: Preheat the oven to 220 degrees (grill). Beat egg whites in a large bowl  until slightly frothy. Then add half the sugar, continue beating. Add the lemon grass powder, corn flour and the rest of the sugar to it. Beat until the mixture is smooth and thick.
  7. Heat the filling shortly and then spread on the dough-ground. Give the egg whites mixture into a piping bag with a smooth nozzle. Put balls of different sizes on the lemon filling. Place the tart in the preheated oven and bake for about 5 minutes until the tip is golden brown.
  8. Serve the tart immediately. Otherwise the dough base and the meringue on the filling will become soaked.